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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

least in the highest forms of that relation. But also, it may be and 

often is manifested independently of the procreative function by men and 

women of refinement. In fact, it would seem to be the form of physical 

attraction accompanying the very highest phase of love, particularly in 

women. 

 

It is this affectional function which is manifested by betrothed lovers 

in their beautiful period of mutual understanding, sympathy, and 

affection. It is that characteristic of the courting days which is so 

precious to the woman, but which is too often sadly missed by the wife 

after the honeymoon. It exists often before the fires of passion are 

kindled, and it persists often after the flame of passion has died away. 

It is the expression of the purest love of youth, and of the tenderest 

affection of age. It is this form of sexual relation, physical though it 

may be, that is the outgrowth of evolution in man. May it not be that in 

this way man has "improved upon the sexual habits of the animals"; and 

that when man violates the natural restrictions held sacred by animal 

life, and indulges in excessive sexual relations in and out of season, 

that he is really manifesting a degenerative tendency instead of taking 

an upward step on the evolutionary scale. 

 

There have been many excellent authorities who have held that this 

affectional function, and its manifestation, is far better calculated to 

satisfy the sexual instincts of advanced men and women than is the 

ordinary physical sexual relation. They claim that in the higher form of 

this affectional relation is to be found the secret of the joy, bliss, 

and happiness of the betrothed lovers, which alas! too often disappear 

when the other form of the relation is manifested, particularly when 

manifested to excess in the manner customary to so many married men. 

They claim that in the recognition of this fact of human life and love 

is to be found the secret of married happiness between wedded advanced 

and cultured individuals. They assert that the experience of the race, 

rightly considered and understood, full proves this contention. 

 

Edward Carpenter has the following to say on this point: "It is a matter 

of common experience that the unrestrained outlet of the purely physical 

desire leaves the nature drained of its higher love-forces. * * * There 

are grounds for believing in the transmutability of the various forms of 

the passion, and grounds for thinking that the sacrifice of a lower 

phase may sometimes be the only condition on which a higher and more 

durable phase can be attained; and that, therefore, restraint (which is 


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