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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

absolutely necessary at times) has its compensation. Anyone who has once 

realized how glorious a thing love is in its essence, and how 

indestructible, will hardly need to call anything that leads to it a 

sacrifice; and he is indeed a master of life who, accepting the grosser 

desires as they come to his body, and not refusing them, knows how to 

transform them at will into the most rare and fragrant flowers of human 

emotion * * * Between lovers, then, a kind of hardy temperance is to be 

recommended--for all reasons, but especially because it lifts their 

satisfaction and delight in each other out of the regions of 

ephemeralities (which too often turn into dull indifference and satiety) 

into the region of more lasting things--one step nearer at any rate to 

the eternal kingdom. 

 

"How intoxicating, indeed, how penetrating--like a most precious 

wine--is that love which is the sexual transformed by the magic of the 

will into the emotional and spiritual! And what a loss, on the merest 

ground of prudence and the economy of pleasure, is the unbridled waste 

along physical channels! So nothing is so much dreaded between lovers as 

just this--the vulgarization of love--and this is the rock upon which 

marriage so often splits. There is a kind of illusion about physical 

desire similar to that which a child suffers from when, seeing a 

beautiful flower, it instantly snatches the same and destroys in a few 

moments the form and fragrance which attracted it. He only gets the full 

glory who holds back a little, and he only truly possesses who is 

willing if need be not to possess. * * * It must be remembered, however, 

that in order for a perfect intimacy between two people their physical 

endearment must by the nature of the case be free to each other. The 

physical endearment may not be the object for which they come together; 

but, if it is denied, its denial will bar any real sense of repose and 

affiance, and make their mutual association restless, vague, tentative 

and unsatisfied. I think, from various considerations, that, generally, 

even without the actual physical sex-act, there is an interchange of 

vital and ethereal elements--so that it may be said that there is a kind 

of generation taking place within each of the persons concerned, through 

their mutual influence on each other, as well as that more specialized 

generation which consists in the propagation of the race." 

 

Count Tolstoi said on this subject: "The difference in organization 

between man and woman is not only physiological but extends also into 


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