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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

other and moral characteristics, such as go to make manhood in man, and 

womanhood (or femininity) in woman. The attraction between the sexes is 

based not merely upon the yearning for physical union, but likewise upon 

that reciprocal attraction exerted by the contrasting qualities of the 

sexes each upon the other, manhood upon womanhood, and womanhood upon 

manhood. The one sex endeavors to complement itself with the other, and 

therefore the attraction between the sexes demands a union of spirit 

precisely identical with the physical union. 

 

"The tendency toward physical and spiritual union forms two phases of 

manifestation of one and the same fountain-head of desire, and they bear 

such intimate relations to each other that the gratification of the one 

inclination inevitably weakens the other. So far as the yearning for 

spiritual union is satisfied, to that extent the yearning for physical 

union is diminished or entirely destroyed; and, vice versa, the 

gratification of the physical desire weakens or destroys the spiritual. 

And, consequently, the attraction between the sexes is not only physical 

affinity leading to procreation, but is also the attraction of opposites 

for one another, capable of assuming the form of the most spiritual 

union in thought only, or of the most animal union, causing the 

propagation of children, and all those varied degrees of relationship 

between the one and the other. The question of upon which footing the 

relation between the sexes is to be established and maintained, is 

settled by deciding what method of union is regarded at any given time, 

or for all time, as good, proper, and therefore desirable. * * * 

 

"The nearer the union approaches the extreme physical boundary, the more 

it kindles the physical passions and desires, and the less satisfaction 

it gets; the nearer it approaches the opposite extreme spiritual 

boundary, the less new passions are excited and the greater is the 

satisfaction. The nearer it is to the first, the more destructive it is 

to animal energy; the nearer it approaches the second, the spiritual, 

the more serene, the more enjoyable and forceful is the general 

condition. * * * Taking into consideration the varying conditions of 

temperament, and above all what the contracting parties regard as good, 

proper, and desirable, marriage for some will approach the spiritual 

union, and for others the physical; but the nearer the union approaches 

the spiritual the more complete will be the satisfaction. The substance 

of what has been said is this: that the relation between the sexes have 


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