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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

useless to do so, for we must bear in mind that no method can be 

absolutely approved or absolutely condemned. Each may be suitable under 

certain conditions and for certain couples, and it is not easy to 

recommend any method indiscriminately. We need to know the intimate 

circumstances of individual cases. For the most part, experience is the 

final test. 

 

"Forel compared the use of contraceptive devices to the use of 

eyeglasses, and it is obvious that, without expert advice, the results 

in either case may sometimes be mischievous or at all events 

ineffective. Personal advice and instruction are always desirable. In 

Holland nurses are medically trained in a practical knowledge of 

contraceptive methods, and are thus enabled to enlighten the women of 

the community. This is an admirable plan. Considering that the use of 

contraceptive measures is now almost universal, it is astonishing that 

there are yet so many 'civilized' countries in which this method of 

enlightenment is not everywhere adopted. Until it is adopted, and a 

necessary knowledge of the most fundamental facts of sexual life brought 

into every home, the physician must be regarded as the proper adviser. 

It is true that until recently he was generally in these matters a blind 

leader of the blind. Nowadays it is beginning to be recognized that the 

physician has no more serious and responsible duty than that of giving 

help in the difficult path of sexual life. Very frequently, indeed, even 

yet, he has not risen to a sense of his responsibilities in this matter. 

It is well to remember, however, that a physician who is unable or 

unwilling to give frank and sound advice in this most important 

department of life, is unlikely to be reliable in any other department. 

If he is not up to date here, he is probably not up to date anywhere. 

 

"Whatever may be the method adopted, there are certain conditions which 

it must fulfill, even apart from its effectiveness as a contraceptive, 

in order to be satisfactory. Most of these conditions may be summed up 

in one: the most satisfactory method is that which least interferes with 

the normal process in the act of intercourse. Every sexual act is, or 

should be, a miniature courtship, however long marriage may have lasted. 

No outside mental tension or nervous apprehension must be allowed to 

intrude. Any contraceptive proceeding which hastily enters the 

atmosphere of love immediately before or immediately after the moment of 

union is unsatisfactory and may be injurious. It even risks the total 

loss of the contraceptive result, for at such moments the intended 


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