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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

method may be ineffectively carried out, or neglected altogether. No 

method can be regarded as desirable which interferes with the sense of 

satisfaction and relief which should follow the supreme act of loving 

union. No method which produces a nervous jar in one of the parties, 

even though it may be satisfactory to the other, should be tolerated. 

Such considerations must for some couples rule out certain methods. We 

cannot, however, lay down absolute rules, because methods some couples 

may find satisfactory prove unsatisfactory in other cases. Experience, 

aided by expert advice, is the only final criterion. 

 

"When a contraceptive method is adopted under satisfactory conditions, 

with a due regard to the requirements of the individual couple, there is 

little room to fear that any injurious results will be occasioned. It is 

quite true that many physicians speak emphatically concerning the 

injurious results to husband or to wife of contraceptive devices. 

Although there has been exaggeration, and prejudice has often been 

imported into this question, and although most of the injurious results 

could have been avoided had trained medical help been at hand to advise 

better methods, there can be no doubt that much that has been said under 

this head is true. Considering how widespread is the use of these 

methods, and how ignorantly they have often been carried out, it would 

be surprising indeed if it were not true. But even supposing that the 

nervously injurious effects which have been traced to contraceptive 

practices were a thousandfold greater than they have been reported to 

be--instead of, as we are justified in believing, considerably less than 

they are reported--shall we therefore condemn contraceptive methods? To 

do so would be to ignore all the vastly greater evils which have 

followed in the past from unchecked reproduction. It would be a 

condemnation which, if we exercised it consistently, would destroy the 

whole of civilization and place us back in savagery. For what device of 

man, ever since man had any history at all, has not proved sometimes 

injurious? 

 

"Every one of even the most useful and beneficial of human inventions 

has either exercised subtle injuries or produced appalling catastrophes. 

This is not only true of man's devices, it is true of Nature's in 

general. Let us take, for instance, the elevation of man's ancestors 

from the quadrupedal to the bipedal position. The experiment of making a 

series of four-footed animals walk on their hind-legs was very 

evolutionary and risky; it was far more beset by dangers than is the 


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