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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

pleasure in the company of her mate; it being noted that if the ovaries 

are removed, particularly in early life, the woman is apt to lose all 

sexual desire and normal womanly feeling toward the other sex. And, 

finally, these secretions make for general physical and mental health 

and well-being in the woman, and contribute to her vivacity, energy, 

and activity in all directions. As writers on the subject have well 

pointed out, this is the reason that capable surgeons usually try to 

leave at least a portion of the Ovaries when performing an operation for 

the removal of those organs on account of diseased condition. 

 

THE OVUM. The Ovum, or human egg, is a small spherical body, measuring 

from one two-hundred-and-fortieth to one one-hundred-and-twentieth of an 

inch in diameter. It has a colorless transparent envelope, the latter 

enclosing the yolk which consists of granules or globules of various 

sizes embedded in a viscid fluid. In the center of the yolk is found a 

very small vesicular body consisting of a tenuous transparent membrane, 

which is known as "the germinal vesicle;" this, in turn, contains a very 

tiny granular structure, opaque, of yellow color, known as "the germinal 

spot." 

 

When the time is reached in which the ovum or egg is to be discharged, 

the Graafian follicle becomes enlarged by reason of the accumulation of 

the fluids in its interior, and exerts such a steady and increasing 

pressure from within, outward, that the surrounding tissue yields to it, 

and it finally protrudes from the Ovary, from whence it is then expelled 

with a gush, owing to the elasticity and reaction of the neighboring 

tissues. 

 

Following this rupture there occurs an abundant hemorrhage from the 

vesicles of the follicle, the cavity being filled with blood, which then 

coagulates and is retained in the Graafian follicle. The formation and 

development of the Graafian follicle begins at puberty and continues 

until the menopause or "change of life" of the woman. Many follicles are 

produced, but many do not produce ova, and so gradually atrophy. The 

ripening and discharge of the eggs produce a peculiar condition of 

congestion of the entire female sexual organism, including the Fallopian 

Tubes, the Uterus, the Vagina, and even of the Vulva, which results in a 

condition of Sexual Excitement. Among the lower animals the female will 

allow the male to approach her for copulation only at this period, this 

being the time when the egg is ready for fertilization. 

 

When the female infant is born, her Ovaries contain the germs of about 


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