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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

menstrual flow consists of a thin, bloody fluid, having peculiar odor, 

in which is combined blood, thin skin, and mucus membrane, and also 

mucus from the Uterus and the Vagina, the blood being light in 

consistency and not clotted. 

 

During the menstrual period the ovum, or egg, is discharged, and enters 

the Uterus, as we shall see presently. 

 

THE LIFE-HISTORY OF THE OVUM. The physiology of the remaining sexual 

organs of the woman may perhaps best be studied by considering the story 

of the Life-History of the Ovum, or human egg, for the functions of such 

organs are concerned with such life-history of the egg, and really exist 

merely to create such a history, or rather, to produce the process which 

constitutes the basis of such history. 

 

The ovum, or egg, when discharged from the ovary, is at first surrounded 

by a few cells which serve as nourishment, but which soon disappear. It 

enters the Fallopian Tube and begins its journey toward the Uterus, 

being urged on its way by the constant movement of the lining-cells of 

the interior of the tube, in the direction of the Uterus. Certain 

changes in structure occur. Its passage to the Uterus may be 

interrupted, and the ovum lost and finally cast off. But the ovum that 

is successful finally arrives at the Uterus where it awaits impregnation 

or fertilization by the spermatozoon of the male. 

 

If copulation occurs within a reasonable time after the arrival of the 

ovum, it is impregnated or fertilized. Fecundation results and 

conception ensues, the ovum then remaining attached to the walls of the 

Uterus, and in time develops into the foetus. If, however, the ovum is 

not impregnated, because of absence of copulation or from other causes, 

it gradually loses its vitality, and is finally cast off with the 

several uterine secretions. 

 

It should be explained here that the "spermatozoon" of the male (the 

plural of the term is "spermatozoa") is the male generative "seed." The 

sperum, semen, or seminal fluid of the male is filled with hundreds of 

thousands of spermatozoa. Each spermatozoon is a minute living, moving 

creature, resembling a microscopic tadpole. It has a head, a rod-like 

body, and a thin hair-like tail, the latter being kept in constant 

motion from side to side, by means of which the tiny creature is enabled 

to travel rapidly from one point to another. The human spermatozoon 

measures about one six-hundredth of an inch in length. It is composed of 

protoplasm, the substance of which all living creatures are composed. 

The spermatozoa are believed to be developed from a parent sperm-cell, 


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