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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

by the process of segmentation or subdivision, which process is common 

to all cell-life. The numerous spermatozoa dwell in a gelatinous 

substance, which, mingling with the other fluidic secretions of the 

glands of the male, constitutes the male seminal fluid, sperm, or semen, 

which is ejaculated by the male during the process of copulation. 

 

Fecundation (i. e. fertilization, impregnation; the process by which the 

male reproductive element is brought in contact with the female ovum or 

egg) is brought about by the blending of the male reproductive element 

(or spermatozoon) with the female reproductive element (or ovum, or 

egg). This blending is of course accomplished by the bringing together 

in mutual contact the two reproductive elements just mentioned. The 

sexual act which results in this "bringing together" of the two elements 

is known as "copulation," or "coition." In copulation or coition the 

seminal fluid of the male, containing an enormous number of spermatozoa, 

is ejaculated from the male intromittent organ into the receptive canal 

or channel of the female (the Vagina), and in this way finally comes 

into actual contact with the female ovum or egg which is awaiting it in 

the Uterus of the female. 

 

The spermatozoa (in the process of copulation) are deposited in the 

Vagina of the female, usually at its upper end, but sometimes in the 

lower portion; and in rare and peculiar cases even at or about the 

Vaginal Orifice or outer vaginal opening. In either case they travel up 

the remaining portion of the Vagina and finally enter the Uterus or 

womb. The spermatozoa possess wonderful vitality and power of 

locomotion. There are cases recorded in which the spermatozoa deposited 

on or about the outer female genitals have managed to travel inward and 

upward until they have finally reached the Uterus, where conception has 

resulted. Such cases, of course, are rare, but they exist, well 

authenticated and accepted by medical science as facts. 

 

It must not be supposed, however, that the impregnation of the ovum 

occurs only in the womb proper. Cases are known in which the spermatozoa 

have traveled along the Fallopian Tubes and impregnated the ovum there; 

and in very rare cases the spermatozoon seems to have penetrated even to 

the Ovary itself, and there impregnated the ovum on the surface of the 

Ovary. Some excellent authorities, in fact, insist that all normal 

impregnation occurs at the end of the Fallopian Tube--the point of its 

entrance into the upper part of the womb, rather than in the body of the 

womb, or at its mouth, as the older authorities taught. But wherever the 


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