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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

LESSON IV 

 

GESTATION OR PREGNANCY 

 

 

Gestation is "the act of carrying young in the Uterus, from the time of 

conception to that of parturition." Conception occurs at the moment of 

the impregnation of the ovum; parturition is the act of delivery, or 

childbirth. Pregnancy is "the state of being with child." The terms 

"period of gestation," and "period of pregnancy," respectively, are 

employed by medical authorities to designate the time during which the 

mother carries the young within her own body--from the moment of the 

impregnation of the ovum until the moment of the final delivery of the 

child into the outer world. 

 

The term of pregnancy in woman continues for over nine calendar months 

(or ten lunar months)--from about 275 to 280 days, though in exceptional 

cases it may be terminated in seven calendar months, or on the other 

hand may continue for ten calendar months. The usual method is to figure 

280 days from the FIRST DAY of the LAST MENSTRUATION. A simple method of 

calculating the probable date of delivery is as follows: COUNT BACK 

THREE MONTHS, AND THEN ADD SEVEN DAYS, AND YOU WILL HAVE THE DATE OF 

PROBABLE DELIVERY. Example: A woman's FIRST DAY OF LAST MENSTRUATION is 

March 28. Counting back three months gives us December 28; and adding 

seven days to this gives us January 4, as the date of probable delivery. 

There will always be a possible margin of a few days before or after the 

ascertained probable date--but the delivery will very closely 

approximate said date. Ignore the shortage of days of February in this 

calculation, the same being covered by the general margin allowed. 

 

DEVELOPMENT OF THE IMPREGNATED OVUM. In the preceding lesson we 

terminated our consideration of the impregnated ovum at the point at 

which, after the process of segmentation, the "primitive trace" had 

appeared. This primitive trace appears as an opaque streak, or straight 

line, formed of an aggregation of cells of a distinctive quality. This 

delicate "trace" or "streak" is the first indication of the form of the 

coming child. It is the basis, pattern, or mould, in or around which the 

spinal column is to be formed, and around which the entire young body is 

to be developed by the wonderful and intricate processes of dividing and 

reduplication, and the folding and combination of cells. From one end of 

this "trace" develops the head; from the other end develops the lower 

end of the spine. At a later stage there appear tiny "buds" in the 

positions at which the arms and legs should be; these gradually develop, 

and their ends split into tiny fingers and toes, and finally are 


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