Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

transformed into perfect little arms and legs, miniatures of those of 

the adult human being. 

 

The term "the embryo" is employed to designate the developing young 

creature in the earlier stages of its development, particularly before 

the end of the third month of its existence. After the end of the third 

month the embryo is called "the fetus." In the short space of 280 days 

the young creature evolves and develops from a single simple cell into a 

complex organism--a perfect miniature human being. Nature works a 

wonderful miracle here, and yet so common is it that we take it all as a 

matter of course, and lose sight of the miracle. From the most simple 

forms are formed in the developing creature the most complex organs and 

parts. The heart is formed from a tiny straight line of cells, by 

enlargement and partition. The stomach and intestines, likewise, develop 

from a tiny straight line of cells arranged as a tiny tube--the stomach 

is formed by dilation of one part of the tube, while the large 

intestine experiences a similar though lesser distention and a greater 

growth in length; the smaller intestines being formed by growth in 

length and circumference. The other organs evolve from similar simple 

beginnings. 

 

The embryo is nourished during its earlier stages by means of the "yolk 

sack," or "umbilical vesicle," which is outside the body of the embryo, 

being joined to it by means of the umbilical duct. This yolk sack 

(originally formed by a "drawing together" in the ovum, which thus 

separates itself into two portions or areas) is an important feature of 

the life of the embryo, as it nourishes and sustains it in its earlier 

stages. Blood vessels form in this yolk sack, and after a time its fluid 

is absorbed, and after the third month the sack gradually disappears. 

 

After the passing away of the yolk sack, the embryo is nourished and 

sustained by the "allantois," another peculiar sack which is formed. 

This sack readily becomes filled with blood-vessels, and serves to 

nourish the embryo by sustenance obtained from the body of the mother 

through the walls of the Uterus, a direct communication with the 

blood-vessels of the mother thus being secured. The blood in the embryo, 

and that in the mother, come into close contact, thus allowing the 

embryo to be nourished by the blood of the mother. After a time, in 

turn, the allantois diminishes and dwindles away, its offices being 

taken up and performed by the "placenta" or "afterbirth." 

 

THE PLACENTA OR AFTERBIRTH. The Placenta, or afterbirth, is a round, 


Page 2 from 8:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   8   Forward