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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

flat substance or organ, contained within the Uterus, by which 

communication and connection is established and maintained between the 

fetus and the mother, by means of the umbillical cord. It is a flat, 

circular mass, about seven inches in diameter, and weighing about 

sixteen ounces. It is attached to the sides of the Uterus of the mother 

during the period of gestation, and is expelled from the body of the 

mother, as "the afterbirth," after the birth of the child. 

 

Let us pause a moment, and reconsider the several steps in Nature's plan 

for nourishing the embryo and fetus. In the first place, as we have 

seen, there is the yolk sack or umbillical vesicle, filled with a fluid 

which nourishes the embryo. This gradually disappears in time, and is 

replaced by the "allantois" which by connection with the walls of the 

Uterus is enabled to nourish the fetus from and by the blood of the 

mother. For a short time, however, the embryo is nourished by both the 

yolk sack and the allantois. Then the allantois assumes the entire task, 

and the yolk sack passes away. Then, later, the placenta replaces the 

allantois, and the latter passes away as did its predecessor. The 

placenta works along the same general lines as the allantois, but is a 

far more complex way and with a much higher degree of efficiency, as we 

shall see presently. 

 

The placenta is connected with the body of the fetus by what is known as 

"the umbillical cord." The "umbillicus" or "navel" in the human being 

marks the place at which the umbillical cord entered the body of the 

fetus, from which it was severed after the birth of the child. The 

purpose of the umbillical cord is to contain and support the umbillical 

arteries and veins through which the fetus obtains nourishment from the 

placental substance, and through which the return blood flows. The rich 

red arterial blood is carried from the placenta to the fetus, and is 

then distributed over the body of the fetus, nourishing and building it 

up; the dark venous blood, laden with the waste products of the body of 

the fetus, is carried back to the placenta, there to be repurified and 

rendered again rich and nourishing. 

 

The story of the circulation of the blood of the fetus is most 

interesting. Although the fetal blood is derived from that of the 

mother, as we have said, yet the maternal blood does not pass directly 

from the circulatory system of the mother into that of the fetus; nor 

does the blood of the fetus return directly into the circulatory system 

of the mother. In fact, the fetal blood never comes in direct contact 


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