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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

with that of the mother, or vice versa. The fetus has an independent 

circulatory system of its own, and yet, at the same time, from the 

moment of the placental connection until the moment of childbirth, all 

its nourishment is derived from its mother. 

 

The secret of the above paradoxical statement is made apparent when we 

understand the meaning of the scientific term "osmosis." Osmosis is "the 

passage of a fluid through a membrane"; it is a chemical process, caused 

by the chemical affinity between two liquids or gases separated one from 

the other by a porous diaphragm or substance. In the process of osmosis 

in the case before us, the fetal blood takes up nourishing substances 

and oxygen from the blood of the mother, and passes on to the latter the 

waste products of the fetal system, by means of passing these substances 

through the thin porous membranes which separate the two independent 

systems of blood vessels, i. e., the system of the fetus, and that of 

the mother. Before birth, in fact, the fetus has its blood nourished and 

oxygenated by means of the food partaken of by its mother, and the 

oxygen taken in by the mother in her breathing. After its birth, the 

infant eats and breathes for itself, and thus nourishes its blood supply 

directly, instead of receiving it indirectly from the mother. 

 

The Placenta begins to be formed about the third month of gestation, and 

continues to develop steadily from that time. At the time of the 

delivery of the child the Placenta covers nearly or quite one-third of 

the inner space of the distended Uterus of the mother. The total 

"afterbirth" consists of the Placenta, the umbillical cord, and the 

remaining membranes of the ovum, all of which are expelled after the 

birth of the child. 

 

THE AMNION. An important appendage contained in the Uterus in connection 

with the developing fetus is that known as "The Amnion." This is an 

inner sack which forms within the womb, and which serves to enclose the 

fetus, and also to sheath the umbillical cord. The Amnion encloses the 

embryo very snugly during the early stages of its development, but it 

gradually becomes distended with a pale watery fluid, known as "the 

amniotic fluid," the purpose of which is to "float" the fetus and to 

give it mechanical support on all sides. This fluid is composed of water 

carrying in solution small quantities of albumin, urea, and salt. 

 

SEX IN THE EMBRYO AND FETUS. It is impossible to determine the sex of 

the embryo during its early stages. During the fourth week the first 

traces of the sexual glands appear, but not until the fifth week can the 


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