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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

sex be determined even by the microscope. If the embryo is to become a 

male, certain ducts are transformed into convoluted tubules, and each is 

attached to the testes which have been formed from the genital nucleus. 

If the embryo is to become a female, the ducts join to form the uterus 

and vagina, other portions being transformed into the fallopian tubes 

and connecting with the ovaries which have been formed otherwise. The 

outer genitals appear in the early stages of the embryo, but there is no 

apparent distinction between the sexes, the external organs being the 

same in all cases, and consisting of a small tubular organ with a small 

lateral fold of skin on either side. Later, in the male, a groove 

appears on the under side of this primitive organ, thus forming the 

urethra, the scrotum being formed from the folded skin at the side. In 

the female, the primitive organ ceases to develop as in the male, and 

thus becomes proportionately smaller, and evolves into the clitoris of 

the female; the two lateral folds, on each side, being transformed into 

the labia majora, or "outer lips" of the female external genitals. 

 

POSITION OF THE FETUS. During the period of gestation the fetus lies 

"curled up" in the bag of the amnion. The head is usually relaxed and 

inclined forward, the chin resting on the breast; the feet are bent up 

in front of the legs, the legs bent up on the thighs, the knees 

separated from each other, but the heels almost touching on the back of 

the thighs; the arms bent forward and the hands placed between them as 

though to receive the chin between them. The folded-up fetus forms an 

oval, the longest diameter of which is about eleven inches at its 

greatest stage of growth. Nature here shows a wonderful ability to pack 

the fetus into as little space as possible, and in such a position as to 

protect it from injury, and to discommode the mother as little as 

possible. 

 

The following interesting statement made by Helen Idleson, M. D., in a 

European medical journal several years ago, gives a very clear idea, 

expressed in popular terms, of the appearance and characteristics of the 

embryo or fetus in the various stages of its development: 

 

"The growth of the embryo after fecundation is very rapid. On the TENTH 

DAY it has the appearance of a semi-transparent grayish flake. On the 

TWELFTH DAY it is nearly the size of a pea, filled with fluid, in the 

middle of which is an opaque spot, presenting the first appearance of an 

embryo, which may be clearly seen as an oblong or curved body, and is 


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