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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

DELIVERY. At the termination of the period of gestation, the child is 

born into the world, and, instead of depending upon the blood of the 

mother for nourishment and oxygen, it begins to ingest its own food, to 

eliminate its own waste matter through the regular channels of the body, 

and to use its own lungs for the purpose of obtaining oxygen for its 

blood and to burn up the waste products in the lungs. 

 

The process of bringing a child into the world is called "parturition." 

The fetus is expelled from the body of the mother by the contraction of 

the muscles of and around the Uterus, and also by the contraction of the 

abdominal walls. In the early stages of labor, the uterine muscles are 

brought into play; but when the fetus enters into the vaginal passage 

the abdominal muscles manifest their energy. The uterine and abdominal 

muscular movements are purely involuntary, although the mother may aid 

in the delivery by voluntary muscular movements. The involuntary 

muscular movements are due to the reflex action originating, probably, 

in a part of the spinal cord. 

 

The uterine contractions are rhythmical, and have been compared to the 

contraction of the muscles of the heart. Each "labor pain" begins with a 

minimum of contraction, the activity increasing until a maximum is 

reached, when it gradually decreases, only to be followed a little later 

by a new contraction. When the fetus is finally expelled from the Uterus 

(followed later by the placenta or "afterbirth") that organ begins a 

gradual contraction to its normal size, shape, and condition, the 

restorative process usually lasting over several weeks. 

 

THE PHYSICAL SIGNS OF PREGNANCY. The physical signs of pregnancy in the 

case of women of normal health are as follows: 

 

(1) CESSATION OF THE MENSES, OR MENSTRUATION. While it is true that a 

non-pregnant woman may occasionally pass over a menstrual period, yet as 

a general rule the complete cessation of a period by a married woman, 

particularly when the woman has previously been regular in this respect, 

may be considered a probable indication of pregnancy; and when the 

second period has been passed the probability merges almost into a 

certainty. An examination by a competent physician will set all doubts 

at rest. 

 

(2) ENLARGEMENT OF THE BREASTS. This indication usually manifests itself 

in about six or eight weeks after conception. This enlargement is 

usually preceded by a sensation of tingling and throbbing. The 

enlargement is manifested in the form of a rather hard and knotty 

increase, differing from the ordinary fatty increase; the lobules, 


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