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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

arranged regularly around the nipple, are plainly distinguishable 

beneath the skin by means of the touch of the fingers. 

 

(3) DARKENING OF THE AREOLAR TISSUE SURROUNDING THE NIPPLE. In the 

unimpregnated condition this tissue is of a pinkish shade; but after 

impregnation the shade grows darker and the circle increases in size. 

However, when the woman bears several children in somewhat rapid 

succession, this dark color may become permanent and accordingly ceases 

to be an indication. 

 

(4) ENLARGEMENT OF THE ABDOMEN. This indication manifests itself about 

the second month, at which time the Uterus begins to elevate the 

intestines by rising up from the pelvis. In the fourth month the Uterus 

has risen so far out of the pelvis that it assumes the form and 

appearance of a hard round tumor. The entire abdomen then begins to 

enlarge. The Uterus causes an enlargement in the region of the navel at 

the sixth month, and the region of the diaphragm at the ninth month. 

 

(5) QUICKENING, OR "SIGNS OF LIFE." This indication manifests first from 

the fourth month to the fifth--at about the exact half of the entire 

period of gestation. At this time, and afterward, the movements of the 

embryo are plainly discernable to the mother. 

 

THE DISORDERS OF PREGNANCY. There are a number of physical disorders 

usually accompanying pregnancy, some of which are trifling, but some of 

which require the advice of a competent physician. The best plan is for 

the woman to consult a physician shortly after she discovers herself to 

be pregnant, and thereafter to visit him occasionally for advice during 

the period of gestation. The too common plan of postponing the call upon 

the physician until the eighth or ninth month is not a wise one, for in 

many cases the advice of a competent physician at an earlier stage of 

the pregnancy will obviate serious complications. The call upon the 

physician should usually be made not later than the third or fourth 

month, and positively not delayed longer than the fifth month. The 

physician should make an examination to ascertain whether the child is 

in the normal position in the Uterus, and should also examine the urine 

each month to ascertain whether the kidneys are functioning normally. 

 

What is called "morning sickness" is one of the most common of the 

disorders of pregnancy. It is marked by nausea or vomiting, or both, 

early in the morning, usually shortly after arising. Some women have at 

least faint symptoms of this disorder from the very beginning of 

conception, but usually it does not manifest until the third, fourth, or 


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