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CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

 

AMENORRHEA, another disorder arising in connection with the menstrual 

process, consists of the retention or suppression of the menses, or of 

"scanty" menses, or occasional "skipping" of the periods. This condition 

is apt to be manifest in cases of extreme obesity or "fatness;" the 

nervous system being burdened with superfluous flesh, its menstrual 

rhythm is often affected. Suppression of the menses also sometimes 

results from exposure and disturbing mental emotions. The most approved 

treatment is that of remedying the abnormal general physical condition, 

proper diet, and the use of hot drinks, hot sitz baths, and hot enemas 

about the time of the beginning of the normal period. 

 

MENORRHAGIA, another menstrual-period disorder, consists of very profuse 

flowing--it is, in fact, a mild form of hemorrhage. It usually arises 

from general debility, shocks, too violent exercise or labor, and also 

in many cases from undue and too frequent sexual intercourse. Sometimes 

the excessive flow occurs during the regular menstrual period, while in 

other cases it may manifest itself out of season--sometimes as often as 

two or three times a month. The duration of the normal period of 

menstrual flow, however, varies greatly among different women; the 

normal period may be said to last from two to six days, so what might be 

an excessive flow for one woman would be only normal for 

another--temperament plays a large part in determining the quantity of 

the menses. 

 

Some of the accompanying symptoms of Menorrhagia, or profuse flow, are 

lassitude, shortness of breath, faintness, dizziness, headache, 

irritability and nervousness, and often also leucorrhea between periods. 

The general treatment consists in measures calculated to bring the 

general health of the woman back to the normal. The building up of the 

general system, by means of nourishing food, proper exercise, etc., will 

almost always result in curing this disorder. 

 

A well-known authority has well said: "The hygiene of menstruation can 

be expressed in two words: CLEANLINESS AND REST." 

 

So far as Rest is concerned, the woman need not be urged to take it at 

this period--that is, if she is able to do so. Care should be taken not 

to exercise unduly at this time, and under the head of exercise may be 

included dancing, horseback riding, and automobiling, as well as the 

more common forms of athletic work. 

 

It would seem that common sense and the general desire for cleanliness 

and daintiness would cause all women to observe the plain hygienic laws 

of Cleanliness at the time of the menstrual period. And, indeed, it is 


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