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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

probable that such would be the case were it not for the fact that some 

ancient superstitions still exert their power over the mind of many 

women, in regard to the use of water during the menstrual period. While 

it is true that cold baths, or cold-water bathing, are not advisable for 

the average woman during the menstrual period (although some especially 

robust women bathe and swim as usual during this period), this 

prohibition does not apply to the use of WARM water during the period. 

Lukewarm baths are permissible at this time; and the woman should wash 

the external genital parts with warm water, with soap if desired, every 

morning and evening of the period. A vaginal douche of lukewarm water is 

an excellent adjunct to the bathing of the parts. 

 

It is astonishing to meet with the superstitious prejudice existing in 

the minds of some women concerning the use of the vaginal douche; these 

good creatures seem to think that it is either unnatural and unhealthy, 

or else is something "not respectable," and fit only for the use of 

immoral women. These women should get in touch with modern hygienic 

methods, and learn to use the douche at least during their menstrual 

periods. At this time, if the plain rules of cleanliness are not 

observed, there often occurs a decomposition of the blood which has 

gathered in or about the genitals, and an offensive odor is manifested. 

Some women, while feeling distressed about this odor, are afraid to use 

lukewarm water in washing themselves, owing to some old unexplored 

superstition handed down from the great-grandmother's time. 

 

The napkins should be changed at least every morning and evening. 

Unclean napkins may lead to infection, and it is probable that many 

cases of leucorrhea have their origin in lack of cleanliness concerning 

the napkins, cloths, or rags, used during menstruation. It may seem 

almost incredible to the average woman reader, but physicians know of 

cases (usually among the poorer and more ignorant foreign classes) in 

which the girl is instructed by her mother, grandmother, or aunts, that 

she must wear the original cloth or rag during the entire period, as she 

will "catch cold" by a change to a clean, fresh cloth while the flow 

continued. Imagine the result of such a practice! This last is an 

extreme instance, of course, but it will serve to show the absurd and 

harmful notions prevalent concerning this important natural function, 

and its incidents. 

 

LEUCORRHEA. A very common disorder among women is that known as 

Leucorrhea, or "the whites." It consists of a discharge from the Vagina, 


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