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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

of the death-rate is concerned, and the only persons with whom a 

practical quarrel remains are those who applaud the mother who boasts 

that she has buried twelve." 

 

The Eugenists urge that if the principles applied to plant-life by that 

master of his science, Luther Burbank, were applied to the production 

and rearing of young human life, in a few generations we should have a 

race so far advanced beyond the present average as to be almost god-like 

by comparison. But this means a far different thing from the ideal of 

merely "more children"--it requires the manifestation of the ideal of 

"better children," well born, carefully reared, well nourished, and 

scientifically educated. And this rearing, nourishing, and education 

must not be confined to the physical part of the child's nature--it must 

proceed along the three-fold line of physical, mental, and moral 

culture. 

 

The Eugenists have been actively concerned with the question of the 

prevention of the transmission of undesirable qualities to offspring. 

They have held that while crime is more frequently rather the result of 

evil environment than of criminal heredity, nevertheless there is a 

large class of children who are "born criminals"--that is, born with 

such a decided tendency toward criminal acts that the slightest 

influence of environment may, and often does, serve to kindle into a 

blaze the undesirable and criminal characteristics. 

 

Dr. Saleeby says of this: "In the face of the work of Lombroso and his 

school, exaggerated though some of their conclusions may be, we cannot 

dispute the existence of born criminals and the criminal type. There are 

undoubtedly many such persons in modern society. There is an abundance 

of crime which no education, practiced or imaginable, would eliminate. 

Present day psychology and medicine and, for the matter of that, 

ordinary common-sense, can readily distinguish cases at both 

extremes--the mattoid or semi-insane criminal at one end, and the decent 

citizen who yields to exceptional temptation at the other end." 

 

The Eugenists quote as an instance of the above contention the 

celebrated case of Max Jukes, a notorious criminal and drunkard, who as 

the records show us was the ancestor of a foul brood of descendants 

which cost the State of New York over a million dollars in seventy-five 

years. Among these descendants were 200 thieves and murderers; 285 

subject to idiocy, blindness or deafness; 90 prostitutes; and 300 

children born prematurely. It is possible that a portion of this evil 

result was caused not alone by bad heredity but, at least in part, by 


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