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Table of contents
CONTENTS
LESSON-1-2
LESSON-3
LESSON-4.1
LESSON-4.2
LESSON-5.1
LESSON-5.2
LESSON-6.1
LESSON-6.2
LESSON-7.1
LESSON-7.2
LESSON-7.3
LESSON-8
LESSON-9
LESSON-10.1
LESSON-10.2
LESSON-11
LESSON-12
LESSON-13.1
LESSON-13.2
LESSON-14
LESSON-15.1
LESSON-15.2
Contraception
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1
CHAPTER-2-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18-19

gain their real knowledge through sad experience which is to be paid for 

not only by themselves but also by their children. It is a hard saying, 

but true that "the knowledge of the majority of young parents is gained 

by experience paid for by their unborn children." 

 

The Eugenists look forward to the coming of the day when it will be 

regarded as reprehensible to allow young persons to enter into the 

relationship of marriage without a sane, practical knowledge of their 

own reproductive organism and functions, and of their physiological 

duties to themselves, their companions in marriage, and to their 

children born or to be born. We may, in due time, see a practical 

realization of the ideal set forth by Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis, who 

said: "The State that makes a man study two years before a license as 

druggist is given; that makes a young lawyer or doctor study three years 

before being permitted to practice, ought to ask the young man or young 

woman to pass an equally rigid examination before license is given to 

found an American home, and set up an American family." 

 

This idea of the scientific preparation for parenthood is a new one for 

many, but the coming generations will recognize its importance to the 

individual and to the race. Many who recognize the influence of 

pre-natal culture in so far as is concerned the physical, mental, and 

moral condition of the mother during pregnancy, have failed to perceive 

that an equally important influence is exerted by the physical, mental 

and moral condition of BOTH PARENTS before the conception of the child. 

These conditions are reflected, often very markedly, in the child, and 

an avoidance of consideration in this respect is often almost criminal 

negligence. 

 

Eugenists deplore the haphazard way in which children are so often 

conceived. More care is often bestowed upon the conditions precedent to 

the conception of the domestic animals than is given by their owners to 

the conditions preceding the conception of their own offspring. Too 

often, while in the case of the domestic animals the utmost care is 

exercised regarding the arrangement for the breeding of valuable stock, 

the human offspring are mere "accidents," conceived without intention, 

forethought, or preparation; and too often is such conception undesired, 

regretted and unwelcome. 

 

This state of affairs is utterly unworthy of civilized man with the 

knowledge of science at his command, and the intellect and will with 

which to carry out the plain dictates of reason and duty. Nature does 


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